About the blog: What Things Are Made Of

AMERICA'S GLOBAL DEPENDENCY FOR NEARLY EVERYTHING


The United States relies on imports for dozens of commodities in everyday use. Often enough, that reliance is 100%. In this book I aim to provide awareness of the hidden geology and mineralogy behind common things, and to develop an appreciation for the global resource distribution that underpins our society. While concerns about oil import reliance are in the news every day, our needs for other minerals are comparable and are typically unknown even to technologically aware Americans.





About the book

What Things Are Made Of:

America's global dependency for nearly everything


The United States relies on imports for dozens of commodities in everyday use. Often enough, that reliance is 100%. In this book I aim to provide awareness of the hidden geology and mineralogy behind common things, and to develop an appreciation for the global resource distribution that underpins our society. While concerns about oil import reliance are in the news every day, our needs for other minerals are comparable and are typically unknown even to technologically aware Americans.

This blog focuses on Richard Gibson's writings, particularly his book, What Things Are Made Of . You may also find occasional commentary on the writing experience. Don't expect something every day, but do feel free to comment and ask questions.

312 pages. (Chapter 1 available at the link above as a free preview.) The print-on-demand version is $17.95 + $3.00 shipping; e-versions are available for $9.99. It will probably be cheaper for you (and faster) for you to order through the publisher's site (link above). An index can be downloaded at my web site. And there's a blog interview on GreenAnswers, here.

Nook | Kindle | Indiebound and iBookstore too.

For geology, tour guiding, and other information, please visit www.gravmag.com.

About Dick Gibson

Photo by Kathryn Langmyer Henderson
Richard I. Gibson is a geologist, historian, and tour guide in Butte, Montana. After four years analyzing kidney stone mineralogy, he entered the oil exploration business as a geophysicist, a professional career spanning more than 35 years and ranging from Nevada to the Former Soviet Union to the South China Sea. As a geological educator, he has informed audiences ranging from elementary school children to State Geologists of the United States. He's been a geological Study Leader on Smithsonian Journeys in Iceland, Alaska, and western United States, and served as the Education Director at the World Museum of Mining in Butte. Gibson taught college field geology for 14 summers, and explains history, geology, and current events on tours in and around his home in Butte, Montana.

His other book, Lost Butte, Montana, focuses on Butte History.

For more information about Dick Gibson, see his web site


Contacts

E-mail: rigibson@earthlink.netFacebook Goodreads

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